Today’s Meditation Q&A

CalmQuestion: What is the purpose of meditation?

Answer: People are drawn to meditation for many different reasons. Some begin meditating because of a doctor’s recommendation, seeking health benefits such as lowered blood pressure, stress reduction, and restful sleep. Others come to meditation seeking relief from the fearful, angry, or painful thoughts that constantly flood their mind. Still others come to meditation in search of greater self-understanding and expanded states of consciousness.

It is accurate to say that the purpose of meditation depends on the meditator – but it is also true that anyone who meditates regularly receives profound benefits on all of these levels – physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual.

Meditation isn’t a random or chaotic experience. On the contrary, it is a systematic process that allows the mind to experience its nonlocal source – the field of pure potentiality. That is why meditation can be taught and why it produces repeatable results.

We invite you to experience the power of meditation in your own life by joining us for the 21-Day Meditation Challenge beginning February 20. Registration and participation are free! Join us for a guided Mind-Body Odyssey led by Deepak Chopra, davidji, and other master Chopra Center instructors. Learn more and register here.

“There is no greater magic than meditation. To transform the negative into the positive. To transform darkness into light – that is the miracle of meditation.” ~Osho

  1. I am so looking forward to this 21-Day Meditation Challenge.
    I started meditating daily (for about 10 minutes) about three months ago and the results have been simply amazing.
    I’m excited to see what effect a more structured program will have.

    Reply

  2. I am looking forward to gaining some peace and grounding. I have tried meditating and find I struggle to gain focus.

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  3. great article , i enjpyed reading it alot. Flordasaguas22

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  4. There are so many different forms of meditation. All build concentration while others also build mindfulness. Yet, all forms improve health and quality of life. The world would be more at peace if everyone was able to find a form of meditation that suits their personality and goals.

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  5. Please I need help. I feel like I am not myself anymore. I am 44 and 2 years ago I started acting fearful, anxious, depress. I am figuring out that it is the beginning of my perimenopause. I am extremely healthy in many differnt ways. I have even been spiritually strong. My family, work, and everyhting is perfect, no external reasons. I feel like for the first time I am overwhelmed, out of control, and very stressed. For me is even more stressful that I am reluctant to medication. I have been taking antidepressants for a few months, and seems like hormones will be by next prescribtion. I always thought I could fix everything by working with my mind, eating certain foods and herbs, but for the first time I am extremely frustrated. I would like to be the happy girl I used to be 3 years ago. Please can somebody give me some tips, pleaseeee. By the way I am not rich, I work with 950 beautiful children every day. God Bless you.

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  6. Meditation opens us to the nonlocal source, yes. But it takes awhile to get to that level. In earlier stages meditation begins by teaching mental skills that can be used to combat symptoms such as chronic pain, aimlessness, or the low-grade depression and anxiety that are nearly endemic during these stressful times. A meditation practice becomes a process of unfolding into higher and higher levels of awareness. Early on one just gains the ability to sit still. Then one begins to gain mastery over the flow of mental events. Finally, one moves closer to nonlocal influences, the pre-manifest realm behind daily life, or what David Bohm referred to as the holomovement. Development to this final stage takes time and practice, but there are benefits even in one’s earliest meditations. My point is that the nonlocal source may be the ultimate aim, but practitioners do well to focus on more accessible goals early on.

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